Resting in the Borderlands

7c486-6a0120a8df43e7970b01a73d9cd5b6970d-piWritten by Wes Annac, The Culture of Awareness

When most people pass into the fourth dimension, the first place they go is the Borderlands, which we’ve talked about in various Spirit World Chronicles segments.

Most people stay in this realm for as long as they need so they can adjust to the conditions of the new dimension they’re in, and as we’ll learn here, some will rest for quite a while before seeing what the next fourth-dimensional realm has to offer.

It almost goes without saying by this point that the fourth dimension isn’t one solid realm. It’s comprised of various realms and sub-realms – one of which is the Borderlands, where recently departed spirits stay for as long as they need.

The Borderlands are open for as long as departed souls need them, and only when they’re ready will they leave this realm and enjoy the next, higher state of consciousness. As we’ve already learned, the Borderlands are where one greets their departed loved ones, and I’d imagine their loved ones are with them for their entire stay.

Here, we’re going to examine the period of rest and adjustment that’s spent in the Borderlands, and we’ll learn about the things that spirits do and experience before departing for the next realm.

From the Borderlands, one’s explorative options are practically infinite, and if we’ve learned anything about the fourth dimension so far, it’s that there’s plenty to do and explore there.

A channeled source who goes by the name of Archdeacon Wilberforce tells us about the Borderlands, which he elected to stay in so he could serve as a transition guide.

“In this borderland world where I elect to stay, [the individual] needs refreshment and rest.” (1)

W.T. Stead tells us that most people who initially pass into the Borderlands require a lot of rest.

“At first [the newcomer] takes a great deal of rest, having the earth habit of sleep – and it is a necessity – he needs sleep here too, for the present. We have no night as you have, but he sleeps and rests just the same.” (2)

Raymond Logde, who refers to the Borderlands as the ‘vestibule’, tells us that both transitions – from spirit to earth and from earth back to spirit – can be disconcerting.

“The purpose of the time spent in the vestibule is to give the transition from the outer planes to the inner planes more continuity.

“Even though any given person lives more of his lifetime on the inner planes than on the physical, the transition of death is still very abrupt. It can be almost as frustrating as the transition involved in entering the physical plane; in that case, the frustration is being unable to function as you’ve been used to because you are now a tiny baby.

“But in the transition at the time of death, the vestibule experience permits you to continue your patterns of thought about life and afterlife – until you begin to see that these beliefs are all made out of tissue paper and smoke, as it were.” (3)

Resting in the Borderlands with our physical memories intact makes the experience easier, but we aren’t so fortunate when we’re born. We still have quite a few memories of spirit when we’re born, and we perceive spirit more than the earth we incarnated on, but we’re limited in terms of what we can do.

When we pass back into the fourth dimension, however, we’re able to do things we would’ve never thought possible on earth. Most people probably wait to explore their greater capabilities until they’ve adjusted to their ‘new’ homes a little more, but those of us who are knowledgeable about spirit could explore our abilities pretty quickly.

Raymond tells us more about the ‘vestibule’ (i.e. the Borderlands), and likens its experience to the experience of a newborn baby who sleeps a lot.

“It is a kind of layer in one of the inner planes that helps you lessen the shock of passing over. Again I’ll use the analogy of a baby just entering physical life: the baby sleeps a great deal during the first years of its life. During these sleep periods, the spirit of the baby is returning to the inner planes where it can be a total being.

“So these long periods of sleep help the baby make its transition and become accustomed gradually to its new life. The vestibule is a period in which a person who has recently died gets used to being just a spirit.” (4)

He also describes the experiences we have in the Borderlands, which are tailored to fit the expectations we had on earth.

“Everybody goes through a number of stages after passing over, you see. When you first pass over, you usually enter a stage of awareness called the ‘vestibule.’ During this period, you usually experience the kind of afterlife that you have always expected, due to your conditioning, your religious upbringing and training, and your mode of thought.

“As long as you are in the vestibule, these expectations have a kind of reality. In an ultimate sense they are not real, but they are real enough during this period of transition.” (5)

A Christian might perceive Jeshua, for instance, and even if they aren’t technically convening with Jeshua in a real way, they can rest assured that they’ll perceive him on what’s known as the ‘Christ plane’.

Something tells me that the self-created holograms we witness when we pass on contain glimmers of the consciousness of the guides they appear as, but for all we know, they really could be simple holograms created by the mind that are based on our expectations.

Either way, we’ll perceive exactly what or who we expect to perceive in the Borderlands.

We may perceive Jeshua; Mother Mary; we could even perceive an extraterrestrial if we wanted! We create our reality with the things we think, say and do, and this is especially true in the Borderlands and every other fourth-dimensional realm we have yet to explore.

The Borderlands are real, Raymond shares, but they also contain a hint of etheric artificiality.

“I want to distinguish between the vestibule and the portion of the astral plane that some of the others participating in [this] project have referred to as the ‘Peter Pan department.’ The vestibule is not necessarily a fantasy, but it’s not quite real either.” (6)

The Borderlands are real in a sense, but they’re more illusory than the higher fourth-dimensional realm one experiences when their stay in the Borderlands in complete. The realms that lay beyond the Borderlands are far realer, but this initial realm still contains the same glimmers of reality as the rest of the fourth-dimensional realms.

The Borderlands are certainly realer than the third dimension, and this is because our manifestations are less hindered in this realm. We experience a greater degree of spiritual reality than we did on earth, but our experiences and manifestations are still technically illusory compared to the higher fourth-dimensional realms (and the realms beyond them.)

As Raymond tells us, the Borderlands exist to make the transition into the fourth dimension easier.

“It’s really not a fantasy because that sounds as if there are lots of little munchkins running around putting up fake scenery to fool everyone with and that isn’t quite what happens. The vestibule experience is a necessary part of nature. …

“Eventually, … you begin to realize that the vestibule is only a vestibule, made of tissue paper and smoke and cotton candy – it’s not real. This realization is, in a sense, what is meant by the term ‘the second death.’

“You give up your cherished connections with the physical life and begin to adjust to life on the inner planes as it really is – which is startlingly different. If the transition to full reality were abrupt and you weren’t prepared for it, it would be quite a jolt. Something akin to a psychiatric problem could develop.” (7)

We can experience and plan certain events in the Borderlands, Raymond tells us, and we can also receive a unique brand of healing that can only be received in this realm.

“I believe that it has been mentioned that Colene’s grandmother and grandfather [Colene Johnson, David’s wife] were given the chance to have something of a second honeymoon in a part of the vestibule before getting down to the real business of living on the other side.

“I think that this was described as happening in the Peter Pan department, but it was really the vestibule. There is also a certain kind of healing that must be done in this time right after death. This healing is much easier when the person is on somewhat familiar surroundings and has a sense of continuity with his physical life.” (8)

I’d imagine it’d be pretty difficult to heal someone who’s too panicked about the new realm they’re in to receive any sort of healing, and this is why the Borderlands come in handy.

They help people adjust with the fact that they really have died and they’re now experiencing life in a different sphere, and even with the assistance of the Borderlands, I’m sure it can be difficult for some to cope with their deaths.

This is probably why they receive the healing they do, and in the end, I’m sure everyone’s able to adjust and eventually greet the higher realms. A lot of souls are obviously stuck in the lower fourth-dimensional realms where strife and agony rule the day, but even they will eventually be receptive to the healing they require to spiritually soar.

According to Stewart Edward White, some people have to be taught very basic things in the Borderlands because they were unprepared for spirit life when they were on earth.

“Some … people remain in the vestibule quite awhile. They almost have to be taught how to walk again because the adjustment is so difficult. But for physical people who have an awareness of the inner planes, or who prepare themselves for the transition, the period in the vestibule is very short.

“There is an immediate example here in the room – Colene’s grandmother made a very quick adjustment to being on the inner planes and was even able to attend her own funeral. That may sound a bit morbid to you, but it was important to her. It was just a matter of hours for her to make the adjustment to moving around on the inner planes.” (9)

Mike Swain describes what it’s usually like for a ‘backward’ soul to wake up in the Borderlands.

“In the case of the rather backward soul, we place him into a deep torpor as soon as we take charge. When he arrives in this world, he wakes in what appears to him to be a hospital ward.

“The realization filters to him that he is safe and being well looked after; then it gradually dawns on him that there are no doctors or nurses in this hospital; no bandages and no surgical instruments. He himself feels no pain; so his next move is to get out of bed and start exploring, to find out what sort of hospital this is.

“Only then does he realize that he has successfully passed over. It is wonderful to watch his amazement and relief when he realized he is more alive than ever.” (10)

The realization that death isn’t the end has to be one of the most liberating things a person can experience, and it probably helps to wake up in a hospital bed or another setting that’s commonly associated with safety and being looked after.

It helps the recently deceased come to terms with their transition, and the sooner they can come to terms with it, the sooner they can start exploring. I’m sure they’re eventually greeted by a transition guide or a departed loved one, and then, they can really start to learn about their deaths and the realm they’re now in.

Everyone’s experience is obviously different, but a lot of recently deceased people probably experience the familiar hospital scene in the Borderlands before realizing that there’s nothing wrong with their etheric health. They don’t need to worry about their physical health anymore, and their etheric health’s as strong as they’re willing to let it be.

Mike Swain confirms my musing that someone eventually greets and informs the recently deceased.

“It takes some time, quite some time, for all this to register completely; often his first reaction is to go back to bed for another couple of days to get used to the idea of what has happened to him!

“Then one of the elders visits him and answers all the unanswered questions in his mind. You see, the laws of creation are not as easily grasped by these backward souls as they are by their more experienced brothers.” (11)

Gordon Burdick also confirms that departed family members are with the recently deceased in the Borderlands shortly after their transition.

“I have been with your family today, but they are all waiting for your Aunt Marian, who is at present resting here in the place set aside for that purpose. When she really feels rested and refreshed, she will be ready to be received by those members of her family who have been here long enough to be able to introduce her to the new life and help her to get used to it.” (12)

A woman named Barbara, who died after a long bout of illness, describes what it was like to be ‘alive for the first time’.

“I must have slept from time to time, and when I had slept the weariness out of my bones I remember lying in complete harmony and comfort, waiting for the next event, and it came in the form of a voice. I couldn’t see anyone. It was just a voice calling me by name. But my name sounded so beautiful, I hardly recognized it.

“I sat up in order to listen more easily. The voice seemed to be coming from everywhere and it told me to get up and walk to the lake and bathe, and see how the water would give me back my strength. I got up without any effort and we walked, the voice and I, towards the lake.

“When I got there it seemed only natural to jump in from an overhanging rock and the moment I touched the water I knew that I was experiencing real life for the first time. These were the waters of Lethe where one learns and forgets.” (13)

She continues describing her experience.

“I found ecstacy in that lake. The power of movement and the sense of force within me were beyond anything I could ever imagine. How long the voice and I stayed in the water I have no idea. It might have been hours or days.

“I found I could dive to immense depths, lie on the surface and rest without any special effort. And all the time the voice was with me, telling me, holding me, and urging me to do more and make new efforts, to look around and see the country, and then lastly to listen…. I lay and listened.

“At first I heard nothing but the lapping of the water, then a tiny network of sound emerged. It grew until I could define notes and then gradually the whole orchestra of Heaven burst forth – and I just lay and listened.” (14)

I don’t know If Barbara was experiencing the Borderlands, but if she was, her experience was clearly unique. She was almost immediately able to perceive the intense wonders of the fourth dimension, and as she said, they allowed her to feel more alive than ever.

We’ll experience a much greater level of freedom in the higher realms than we do on earth, and we won’t be limited by any constricting rules or practices. We’ll finally be able to be the free spirits we’ve always wanted to be, and we won’t be weighed down by any sort of limitation or hindrance to our ability to enjoy our lives.

Personally, I can’t wait to see what the higher realms have to offer, but we still have a lot to do here on earth before we can greet them and their liberated experiences.

In our final quote, Donald Macleod describes his experience passing into the Borderlands.

“I was not allowed to see much of my surroundings, as I was immediately assailed by a weariness when I experienced the full glory and warmth of the spirit vibrations without the protection of earthly conditions, so I was taken in the sleep state to the spirit hospital.

“Time rolled by, and from a great depth, I slowly emerged from the trance state. I am now aware that I was there for just over seven of your earthly weeks. Through the waves of sleep there came slowly the haunting, beautiful music of the silence.” (15)

Donald and plenty of others like him had to sleep for a long time before he could be fully awakened, because transitioning into the fourth dimension takes a lot out of the spirit. One leaves the physical body, which they were comfortably nestled in for a long time, and experiences an unhindered sense of freedom for the first time.

Perceiving the fourth dimension and all of the wonderfully intense things it offers must be intense and exhausting, and it makes sense that most people need a lot of time to rest and fully cope with their transition before they’re bouncy and jubilant.

Some people probably have a lot of emotional issues to deal with when they initially pass on, because it can be difficult to give up all of their material possessions – not to mention their family on earth.

Luckily, most souls don’t give up their families, and they remain as close to them as they can, guiding them along the difficulties and pains that come with existing on earth. Our departed loved ones likely guide us, and if we’re particularly willing or receptive, we can open up to their presence and thank them for the selfless assistance they’ve given us.

One of the best ways we can raise the planetary vibration is to raise as much awareness of life after death as possible, because it’s the most liberating truth out there.

We can liberate ourselves and the people around us by opening our minds and hearts to the idea that life continues when the physical body ceases to live, and it’ll help us when our time comes to leave the physical body behind and greet the higher realms for good.

We have a lot of awareness to raise about life after death, and this is why I’ll continue to write these reports in an effort to expand our collective understanding of this interesting and important subject.

Our departed friends, family, etc. are watching and assisting us wherever possible, and like I mentioned earlier, we can open up to them and thank them for their assistance if we’re willing enough.

Footnotes:

  1. Henry Thibault, Letters from the Other Side.  London: 1919, 10.
  2. William Thomas Stead, The Blue Island. Experiences of a New Arrival Behind the Veil. Estelle W. Stead and Pardoe Woodman, eds. London: Rider, n.d, 65.
  3. Robert R. Leichtman, M.D. through medium D. Kendrick Johnson, Sir Oliver Lodge Returns. Columbus: Ariel Press, 1979, 68.
  4. Loc. cit.
  5. Ibid., 67-8.
  6. Ibid., 68.
  7. Ibid., 68-9.
  8. Loc. cit.
  9. Robert Leichtman, The Psychic Perspective. Columbia: Ariel press, 1978, 205.
  10. Jasper Swain, From My World to Yours: A Young Man’s Account of the Afterlife. New York: Walker, 1977, 52.
  11. Loc. cit.
  12. Grace Rosher, medium. The Travellers’ Return. London: Psychic Press, 1968, 77.
  13. Cynthia Sandys and Rosamund Lehmann, The Awakening Letters. Jersey: Neville Spearman, 1978, 32-3.
  14. Loc. cit.
  15. P.I. Phillips, Here and There. More Psychic Experiences. London; Corgi Books, 1975., 15-6.

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The Culture of Awareness features daily spiritual and alternative news, as well as articles I’ve written and more. Its purpose is to awaken and uplift by providing material that’s spiritually inspired and/or related to the fall of the planetary elite and our entrance into a positive future.

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