Tag Archives: meditation

A Breathing Exercise to Take You Higher

By Nick Polizzi, Wake Up World

A few years ago, one of my teachers taught me a powerful breathing exercise that I’d like to share with you today.

Variations of this technique have been used for millennia to induce altered states of consciousness and connect more deeply with the divine. On the surface, it’s hard to fathom how breathing alone can take us to such great heights. I had doubts myself – until I gave it a try. As it turns out, I hadn’t given my lungs enough credit – the experience was cathartic in ways that defy description. Continue reading A Breathing Exercise to Take You Higher

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Mind-Body Connection During Meditation Can Now Be Measured, Thanks To Science

By Arjun Walia, Collective Evolution

There are some “scientists” out there who believe that the mind-body connection is complete pseudoscience. This is very strange, especially given the fact that countless peer-reviewed studies published by many reputable scientists and institutions have shown a direct connection between our mind and our body.

We’ll get to some more examples later in the article, but first let’s draw attention to a group of researchers who say they’ve developed a way to measure the physiological phenomena associated with mindfulness-based stress reduction. They have proven the real-time physiological effects of spiritual practice, specifically the way heart and brain activity actually synchronize. Continue reading Mind-Body Connection During Meditation Can Now Be Measured, Thanks To Science

Just Breathe

By Wes Annac, Editor, Openhearted Rebel

Do you want to know yourself? Sit and breathe. Do you want to know the divine? Sit and breathe.

In an overcomplicated world, this simple advice can change everything. No need to push yourself toward some amazing, grandiose personal change. No need to become unhappy trying to live up to some guru’s expectations. No need to abandon who you are in hopes of becoming something more.

Just breathe deeply and let spirit take care of the rest. Continue reading Just Breathe

8 Reasons Why I Meditate Daily – And You Should, Too!

By Tanya Rakhmilevich, The Alternative Daily, Thanks to Body Mind Soul Spirit

Ever since I can remember, I have struggled with anxiety. It has varied in severity throughout my life, but it has always been present — a weight I have carried and tried to manage, sometimes more successfully than others.

It helps to know I am not alone. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, just over 18 percent of US adults struggle with anxiety lasting for at least 12 months. Just under 23 percent are estimated to be living with anxiety classified as “severe.” At times, mine has reached this level. As anyone who has struggled with anxiety knows, it can make day-to-day life very difficult, indeed. Continue reading 8 Reasons Why I Meditate Daily – And You Should, Too!

Relaxation Liberates Awareness

By Steve Beckow, Golden Age of Gaia

I imagine that some people may find it difficult to discuss relaxing.

They may be in pain. They may be in want. It’s hard to think of a subject like this at a time like that.

I was in pain for several months either from the operation or from arthritis in the knee. And it was hard to think of anything except the cessation of pain. Continue reading Relaxation Liberates Awareness

5 Scientifically Backed Reasons to Chant ‘Om’

By Christina Sarich, The Mind Unleashed

Let’s get this straight right up front. ‘Om’ chanting is not religious. It may be practiced by Hindus, and even co-opted in yoga classes all over the U.S. and Europe, but every single religion in the world has its own version of Om chanting, which I’ll detail more completely in a moment.

The chanting of ‘Om,’ or more specifically, Au, Oh, and Mmm is a scientifically-backed system of becoming more in touch with the infinite creative energy of the Universe. This isn’t a metaphoric energy, but a real, grab-a-hold-of-it-and-look-it-in-the-eyes energy which is absolutely alive and pulsating through everything. Continue reading 5 Scientifically Backed Reasons to Chant ‘Om’

Meditation For Beginners: 20 Practical Tips For Quieting The Mind

By Todd Goldfarb, Body Mind Soul Spirit

Meditation is the art of focusing 100% of your attention in one area. The practice comes with a myriad of well-publicized health benefits including increased concentration, decreased anxiety, and a general feeling of happiness.

Although a great number of people try meditation at some point in their lives, a small percentage actually stick with it for the long-term. This is unfortunate, and a possible reason is that many beginners do not begin with a mindset needed to make the practice sustainable.

The purpose of this article is to provide 20 practical recommendations to help beginners get past the initial hurdles and integrate meditation over the long term:

1) Make it a formal practice. You will only get to the next level in meditation by setting aside specific time (preferably two times a day) to be still.

2) Start with the breath. Breathing deep slows the heart rate, relaxes the muscles, focuses the mind and is an ideal way to begin practice.

3) Stretch first. Stretching loosens the muscles and tendons allowing you to sit (or lie) more comfortably. Additionally, stretching starts the process of “going inward” and brings added attention to the body.

4) Meditate with Purpose. Beginners must understand that meditation is an ACTIVE process. The art of focusing your attention to a single point is hard work, and you have to be purposefully engaged!

5) Notice frustration creep up on you. This is very common for beginners as we think “hey, what am I doing here” or “why can’t I just quiet my damn mind already”. When this happens, really focus in on your breath and let the frustrated feelings go.

6) Experiment. Although many of us think of effective meditation as a Yogi sitting cross-legged beneath a Bonzi tree, beginners should be more experimental and try different types of meditation. Try sitting, lying, eyes open, eyes closed, etc.

7) Feel your body parts. A great practice for beginning meditators is to take notice of the body when a meditative state starts to take hold. Once the mind quiets, put all your attention to the feet and then slowly move your way up the body (include your internal organs). This is very healthy and an indicator that you are on the right path.

8) Pick a specific room in your home to meditate. Make sure it is not the same room where you do work, exercise, or sleep. Place candles and other spiritual paraphernalia in the room to help you feel at ease.

9) Read a book (or two) on meditation. Preferably an instructional guide AND one that describes the benefits of deep meditative states. This will get you motivated. John Kabat-Zinn’s Wherever You Go, There You Are is terrific for beginners.

10) Commit for the long haul. Meditation is a life-long practice, and you will benefit most by NOT examining the results of your daily practice. Just do the best you can every day, and then let it go!

11) Listen to instructional tapes and CDs.

12) Generate moments of awareness during the day. Finding your breath and “being present” while not in formal practice is a wonderful way to evolve your meditation habits.

13) Make sure you will not be disturbed. One of the biggest mistakes beginners make is not insuring peaceful practice conditions. If you have it in the back of your mind that the phone might ring, your kids might wake, or your coffee pot might whistle than you will not be able to attain a state of deep relaxation.

14) Notice small adjustments. For beginning meditators, the slightest physical movements can transform a meditative practice from one of frustration to one of renewal. These adjustments may be barely noticeable to an observer, but they can mean everything for your practice.

15) Use a candle. Meditating with eyes closed can be challenging for a beginner. Lighting a candle and using it as your point of focus allows you to strengthen your attention with a visual cue. This can be very powerful.

16) Do NOT Stress. This may be the most important tip for beginners, and the hardest to implement. No matter what happens during your meditation practice, do not stress about it. This includes being nervous before meditating and angry afterwards. Meditation is what it is, and just do the best you can at the time.

17) Do it together. Meditating with a partner or loved one can have many wonderful benefits, and can improve your practice. However, it is necessary to make sure that you set agreed-upon ground rules before you begin!

18) Meditate early in the morning. Without a doubt, early morning is an ideal time to practice: it is quieter, your mind is not filled with the usual clutter, and there is less chance you will be disturbed. Make it a habit to get up half an hour earlier to meditate.

19) Be Grateful at the end. Once your practice is through, spend 2-3 minutes feeling appreciative of the opportunity to practice and your mind’s ability to focus.

20) Notice when your interest in meditation begins to wane. Meditation is hard work, and you will inevitably come to a point where it seemingly does not fit into the picture anymore. THIS is when you need your practice the most and I recommend you go back to the book(s) or the CD’s you listened to and become re-invigorated with the practice. Chances are that losing the ability to focus on meditation is parallel with your inability to focus in other areas of your life!

Meditation is an absolutely wonderful practice, but can be very difficult in the beginning. Use the tips described in this article to get your practice to the next level!

Untangling the Knot of Fear

By Wes Annac, Editor, Openhearted Rebel

Meditation is wonderful.

By bringing your attention to your subconscious, it helps you become aware of things deep within that either help or hurt you. If you meditate for long enough, it’ll reveal the answers to your deepest questions.

Without meditation, I don’t think I could receive the guidance I’ve needed to get through countless problems in life.

Meditation was there for me each time I realized I can’t find what I need in the material world. By becoming silent, still, and willing to listen to the nothingness, I discovered a higher consciousness and the potential to plunge deeper.

Within the meditation-induced nothingness, you discover the intuitive stream of thought that leads to positive places through positive choices. If you can tune in and listen to this intuitive thought stream, it’ll help you stay on the right path.

Continue reading Untangling the Knot of Fear

Love Bubble Meditation

By Gregg Prescott, M.S., In5D.com

The following is an easy meditation that anyone can do, any time!

1. Envision that everybody around you is part of your family.  You can think of it as a family reunion.  By doing so, you will eliminate any judgments or preconceived ideas about any person you may encounter.

2. Imagine your aura expanding outwards. If you are on a city street, you may want to envision your aura covering the entire sidewalk that you are on or even the entire street.  No matter where you are, you can make your aura as large or as small as you like. Continue reading Love Bubble Meditation

How Music and Meditation Address Memory Loss

By Josh Richardson, Prevent Disease, Thanks to The Mind Unleashed

Meditation training program can have measurable effects on how the brain functions even when someone is not actively meditating. The effects are even more pronounced with music. In a recent study of adults with early memory loss, a West Virginia University research team lead by Dr. Kim Innes found that practice of a simple meditation or music listening program may have multiple benefits for older adults with preclinical memory loss. Continue reading How Music and Meditation Address Memory Loss