Approaching Spirituality Authentically

Written by Wes Annac, The Culture of Awareness

Like countless teachers have told us, spiritual evolution isn’t as much about feeling better as it is stripping away all of the falsities from our life until the genuine, authentic seeker within is all that remains.

Once we cleanse ourselves of the things that hinder our development, which are usually pushed onto us by society and influence us for a long time after, we’re left with a purified aspect of our consciousness that can explore itself and help others learn about spirit in a sensible way.

I think authenticity is important, especially if we want to show the way for others. We’ll want to be as approachable as possible for people who might not understand what we’re talking about at first, and we run the risk of pushing away potential newcomers if we aren’t anchored when we talk or write about spirituality.

With great power, such as the power to expand our minds and help others expand theirs, comes the responsibility to use it in a way that newcomers can understand. Most of the themes the conscious community is exploring are paradigm-shattering, but we can help the people who honestly and seriously want to understand their spirituality by presenting these themes in a grounded way.

This is where authenticity comes in.

With true authenticity, we won’t have to worry whether or not the things we say and do are grounded enough to reach others. We won’t have to worry about being grounded or centered at all, because we’ll live so fully in our truth that our insights will naturally pour out in a way that everyone can understand, even if the themes expressed are a little extraordinary.

Open-mindedness entails the willingness to explore themes most people aren’t comfortable with, and I think it’s an important quality, especially for spiritual seekers. What some don’t understand is that it also entails the willingness not to get stuck on certain concepts, thereby stopping ourselves from considering new things.

With authenticity comes the ability to keep an open mind with every belief and philosophy, but we’ll want to make sure we don’t close our minds when we find an appealing belief system, because we could bind ourselves to it and keep ourselves from exploring different concepts.

Open-mindedness can be just as fleeting as it is powerful, and only if we can remain open will we get the best out of our experience and help others in a profoundly approachable way. We’ll challenge ourselves to try new things we might not have been comfortable with before, and we’ll meet failure with patience and the willingness to keep trying.

We’ll be conscious of the things we say and do and how those things are interpreted by others.

We won’t really care what others think about us, but we’ll know how our work comes across to those who need the most assistance and, if necessary, we’ll adjust accordingly. It won’t be to maintain an image, but to present spirituality according to the needs of those who are just starting to open up.

I’m no saint when it comes to sensibly presenting my spirituality, but I’m realizing its importance and I see that if our presentations aren’t centered and maybe a little humble, the rest of the world could have trouble opening up or believing the things we say.

There are also concepts the world just isn’t ready to consider yet, even though some people have been aware of them for decades. The world will get there in its own time, and for now, the best thing we can do is share what we think is approachable enough in a likeable format that’s easy to understand.

I think scientific approaches to spirituality are among the best, because they tend to be the most levelheaded and discerning.

Those of us who don’t consider ourselves scientists by any means can still approach spirituality in a similar way, and along with centeredness, discernment will help us keep an open mind without descending into the philosophical rabbit hole.

The enlightenment path will definitely help us feel better in the long run, but for now, it’s about transcending things that keep us from excelling or presenting our knowledge to the rest of the world, which some people consider their reason for being here at this time.

Shedding limitation, philosophical or otherwise, and stepping into true authenticity is a natural step on the path that the rest of the world will experience when the time’s right. We can assist this transition once we step into our own authenticity, and the result will eventually be an entire planet of awakened, authentic seekers who strive to build a new world.

(Share this article freely.)

I’m a twenty-one year old writer, musician and blogger, and I created The Culture of Awareness daily news site.

The Culture of Awareness features daily spiritual and alternative news, articles I’ve written, and more. Its purpose is to awaken and uplift by providing material about the fall of the planetary elite and a new paradigm of unity and spirituality.

I can also be found on Facebook (Wes Annac and The Culture of Awareness) and Twitter.

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3 thoughts on “Approaching Spirituality Authentically”

  1. Inspiring article, thank you for sharing. You mentioned the scientific approach as a way to express spirituality. What do you think about an approach that involves skillfully asking questions to allow the other person to find their own spiritual truth? I would love to hear your view on this. Thanks again. – Aaron

    Like

    1. Hey Aaron, I think that could be a good idea for people who are willing to open up about their beliefs. Conversation’s always healthy, and it could help everyone involved refine their spiritual understanding. Thanks for the question!

      Much love 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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